Exhaust system flush (winterizing GTI 155 SE)

Messages
62
Likes
9
Location
Burlington, ON
Water Crafts
1995 Sea-doo XP 717
2017 Sea-doo GTI SE 155
#1
Hi all:

Shutting down my GTI 155 SE for the year. One of the steps BPR recommends is flushing out the exhaust with an air compressor. I made the hose with an air tool connector they suggested, put 55 psi on the hose post at the back of the machine and after 30 seconds, no water comes out. But I would swear I can hear some gurgling in there. Am I doing this right? It will get damned cold pretty soon where I live. For my 2 stroke, I simply pull a hose and put marine antifreeze in the exhaust.

Thanks in advance.

KJ
 


skiasylum

Active Member
Messages
181
Likes
19
Location
MSP
Water Crafts
2011 Sea-Doo Wake Pro 215
#2
My sled hibernates in northern Wisconsin for the winter and that’s how I winterize my intercooler and exhaust system. I also hear the gurgling after the water stops flowing from the jet pump but apparently it’s not enough to damage any internal components if it freezes.
 
Messages
62
Likes
9
Location
Burlington, ON
Water Crafts
1995 Sea-doo XP 717
2017 Sea-doo GTI SE 155
#3
My sled hibernates in northern Wisconsin for the winter and that’s how I winterize my intercooler and exhaust system. I also hear the gurgling after the water stops flowing from the jet pump but apparently it’s not enough to damage any internal components if it freezes.
Hmmm, thanks. I really don't feel good about it though knowing there's water in there. Would it hurt if I forced a little antifreeze in the flush port?
 

skiasylum

Active Member
Messages
181
Likes
19
Location
MSP
Water Crafts
2011 Sea-Doo Wake Pro 215
#4
My service manual says nothing about antifreeze in the winterization process and I’m sure the BRP engineers know what there doing as far as cold weather they do live in Canada.
I would not force antifreeze into the flush port but if you wanted to you could do a regular water flush but use a antifreeze solution instead. You need the motor running anytime you use your flush port or you will flood the motor.
 
Messages
4
Likes
2
Water Crafts
2007 seadoo gti
#5
that's what I do. I put a pump in a bucket of antifreeze and connect the pump to the ski, start the machine, and plug the pump in. I place the bucket under the get pump and recycle for a few minutes. its just peace of mind knowing that nothing will freeze. been doing this for about 10 years.
 

ReedMikel

New Member
Messages
3
Likes
1
Location
Monticello, NY
Water Crafts
2008 Seadoo GTI 130
#6
Hi All,

I am wanting to winterize a 2008 GTI 130 that I bought used this summer (my first PWC). The Operator's Guide states to blow compressed air into the "flushing connector on jet pump support". Oddly, when I talked with our local marina guy (non-Seadoo) - he says they always just put RV antifreeze into the hose port on rear of machine, letting it run thru system until you see red antifreeze coming out... Even the Seadoo dealer I purchased from said the same thing. Nobody mentioned doing what is actually listed in the manual. Is the procedure in the manual difficult to do? Or have people had freezing problems when all they did was perform the compressed air flush?
I tend to think our local, non-Seadoo, marina uses the antifreeze approach because it probably works on all brands. But why wouldn't the Seadoo dealer advise to follow the manual? Maybe same reason: they service many brands...

A confused new owner :)
-Mike
 

ReedMikel

New Member
Messages
3
Likes
1
Location
Monticello, NY
Water Crafts
2008 Seadoo GTI 130
#7
I think I got confused when looking at the tiny picture in the Operators Guide of the jet pump support: I thought this was something accessible only from inside engine compartment. I now sense that it's the same black plastic tube that's sticking out on rear (left side ) of machine where you can also attach a garden hose and flush with water (or antifreeze)... So I guess the question remains: is blowing compressed air thru into this tube good enough when winterizing? Or do the antifreeze flush, then blow out with compressed air?
 
Messages
4
Likes
2
Water Crafts
2007 seadoo gti
#8
ive tried the compressed air and never get any water out. I have been pumping in antifreeze for 10 years and store my boat outside in New England. never had a problem and will keep doing what works.
like I said, it peace of mind for me to know that I have nothing but antifreeze running through the boat/exhaust.
 

ReedMikel

New Member
Messages
3
Likes
1
Location
Monticello, NY
Water Crafts
2008 Seadoo GTI 130
#9
I bought a gallon of RV antifreeze at Walmart and flushed it thru hose port/tube on back of machine. Poured the gallon in a large bucket and used a small submersible to pump in (while running). I ordered a "flush kit" off Amazon and will use it to also blow compressed air thru system too. That way if any liquid remains, I knows it's just antifreeze...
 
Messages
8
Likes
0
Location
Alabama
Water Crafts
2006 Sea-Doo rxp
1977 Aristocraft
#10
Im getting A little nervous, guy at work has gotten me little bit worried. I’m getting ready to winterize 2007 Sea-Doo i bought this summer. I live in Alabama and does not get real cold, but tonight it’s supposed to get below freezing a couple of degrees. Should I worry if I do not have time today to flush. It will be stored inside a fully closed barn.. so maybe that will help? Thanks in advance
 
Messages
30
Likes
9
Location
Melbourne, FL
Water Crafts
2007 GTI SE 155
#11
My opinion on the need to winterize the exhaust system with antifreeze is that it is unnecessary because:
The exhaust naturally blows out existing water when you run the machine. Including the antifreeze you are trying to retain in the system
A little residual water (or antifreeze for those attempting) remains. That is why when you try to blow water out with compressed air, nothing comes out.
The freeze danger is having an exhaust pipe completely full of water, having the water completely freeze so hard, that it’s expansion breaks and separates your exhaust components.
You can now tell that if you run your machine properly to flush it after use, that the majority of water is naturally blown out by the engine exhaust, preventing any exhaust piping from being completely full of water.
The freezing of residual water will not expand to any level or point to risk breaking and separating exhaust components.
So just rev your engine a few good times, it will blow out what water is in the exhaust, and don’t waste time with trying to flush with antifreeze.

Be much more concerned with having the proper mix and quality of engine antifreeze in your machine, where you do have full water jackets and heat exchanger plate. A hard freeze for a few weeks or months with very poor coolant would be a concern for engine or heat exchanger frozen water expansion and damage.
 

skiasylum

Active Member
Messages
181
Likes
19
Location
MSP
Water Crafts
2011 Sea-Doo Wake Pro 215
#12
Agree wholly, except that per service manual:

Exhaust system protection

The exhaust system is self draining, but the exhaust manifold needs to be drained to avoid damage if watercraft is stored in area of freezing weather is present.

Using the flush connector located at the rear of vehicle, inject pressurized air into the system until there is no water flowing from the jet pump.

55 psi IS series
100 psi all other models

NOTICE Failure to drain the exhaust manifold may cause severe damage to this component.

Or flush with antifreeze
 

Chris0412

New Member
Messages
21
Likes
0
Water Crafts
Seadoo gti se
#14
I did my oil change, topped off coolant, cleaned the ski and shrink wrapped my ski. There was a tiny bit of water still in hull and my ski is on blocks so I just threw a little bit of pink anti freeze that I used on boat in Hull..... as far as flushing I reved engine 3-4 times blew it all out and still connected the hose for compressor with ski on then ski off and nothing came out so I guess it’s good
 

skiasylum

Active Member
Messages
181
Likes
19
Location
MSP
Water Crafts
2011 Sea-Doo Wake Pro 215
#15
I was just gonna say if you just rev the engine shouldn’t everything come out anyway?
You would sure think so but the exhaust system protection subsection is after draining the external intercooler subsection in the storage procedure section in the service manual. Revving the engine to 4000 RPM is part of the external intercooler draining subsection and also part of the pre oil change procedure. Blowing out the exhaust system and internal intercooler (215) with compressed air is obviously in the exhaust draining subsection so apparently revving the engine to 4000 must not clear enough water out of the exhaust manifold and intercooler to prevent damaging it in below freezing temperature or they would not tell us to blow it out.

I’m thinking maybe BRP had to replace a couple of cracked exhaust manifolds under warranty and maybe this was part their solution .
 
Last edited:
Messages
62
Likes
9
Location
Burlington, ON
Water Crafts
1995 Sea-doo XP 717
2017 Sea-doo GTI SE 155
#16
So I feel pretty dopey but I put the battery back in today and started the machine, revved it up a bit and probably half a quart of water blew out the back. Put compressed air through the hose connector again and no gurgling. I could have sworn I blew the water out of it the last time I used it but I guess not. Pulled the plugs and re-fogged and tucked it back into bed for the winter.

I can't convey the peace of mind this gives me. Thanks all.
 

ski-d00

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,222
Likes
58
Location
St. Marys, Ohio
Water Crafts
2012 RXPX
2012 GTR 215
2006 3D DI
2008 Challenger 230 430HP
#17
Here's what will happen to your intercooler if you blow 100 psi of air through your cooling port. Water will settle down to the low point and freeze and expand, then crack the copper tubes. If you have a supercharged/intercooled machine, you must get antifreeze into your intercooler. They casually mention this in a few years of the operators guides/service manuals and I don't know why they don't recommend pumping pressurized antifreeze through the entire cooling system because it is the correct way to winterize.
20470.jpeg
 

skiasylum

Active Member
Messages
181
Likes
19
Location
MSP
Water Crafts
2011 Sea-Doo Wake Pro 215
#18
Yes, I have two service manuals for 2006 and 2011 4tecs, the 2006 has us disconnecting the upper and lower hoses to the intercoolers and then pouring 200 and 300 ml 100% antifreeze into each the intercooler and exhaust manifold. Then giving us the warning if this is not done severe damage to components will happen.
The 2011 service manual and 2010-7 dealer service bulletin has a completely different process for draining the intercoolers. If its a external intercooler (255) you disconnect the intake hose from the throttle body and start the engine and rev to 4000. If it’s the internal intercooler(215) it has you use the compressed air method (100psi) to drain the exhaust manifold and intercooler and then giving us the draining warning again.
For some reason BRP switched from antifreeze to compressed air between 2006 and 2011?
 

skiasylum

Active Member
Messages
181
Likes
19
Location
MSP
Water Crafts
2011 Sea-Doo Wake Pro 215
#20
Yep, we got a little side tracked with the intercooler winterization, although the (155 no intercooler) and the (215 internal intercooler) exhaust draining and winterization processes are the the same. The (255 external intercooler) has its own process for draining the intercooler and then you separately drain the exhaust manifold.
 
Messages
267
Likes
24
Location
CT
Water Crafts
2017 Spark
#21
My spark is the same procedure, compressed air. I have been doing it the last two years on my two machines and haven't had a problem. When I used the compressor air I do get about a 1/4 cup of water out though on each machine. Though it still sounds a little gurgly after the water stops coming out, haven't had a problem.
 

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