Seadoo DI (Direct Injection) Fuel Pump Replacement Guide

rippey65

New Member
Messages
3
Likes
0
Location
san diego
#51
great post
Here is the entire document in pdf form: View attachment 19073


Seadoo DI (Direct Injection) Fuel Pump Replacement Guide
Background

The Bombardier Seadoos with Direct Injection (DI) are amazing machines, having both performance and economy, but they have had issues with fuel pumps. The Airtex E1067 fuel pump contracted by Bombardier is a specialized high pressure unit that needs only about 4 or 5 amps of current to provide the required 107 psi fuel pressure. However, the metal roller-vane design does not do well with particulates or water in the fuel, which often causes premature pump failure. Most likely due to these issues, Airtex no longer makes this pump, and even if they did, couldn’t sell it to anyone except Bombardier. When faced with a failing fuel pump, DI owners must either replace the entire fuel pump module assembly with an OEM Bombardier part (approx. $800-$1000), or rebuild the module with a suitable fuel pump. There are 15 Seadoo PWC and 2 boats that have or will face that dilemma, as shown in this table.




There are many in-tank (submersible) automotive fuel pumps available, but few that can achieve the required 107 psi pressure needed for Direct Injection. The few candidate pumps that have been “discovered” are mostly referred to as “255 lph” (liters per hour) pumps and built competitively to the well known Walbro GSS-342 (340 series). Typical pump performance curves are shown here for reference. These curves are for the “High Pressure” version of the “255 lph” pumps. The flow curves show that a 255 lph (67 gph) flow rate is at the common 40 psi used in many automotive applications, whereas at 107 psi the pump can still deliver about 15 gph. That is enough flow to feed the 951 DI motor when demanding its highest performance usage. The electrical power curves shown in the graph indicate these pumps on average require about 14A (amps) of current to maintain the 107 psi pressure. Typically these types of pumps can be found that require “only” 12A for the 107 psi. The picture shown here compares three pumps, from top to bottom, the Seadoo OEM Airtex E1067 roller-vane, Walbro GSS342 gerotor (or HFP-342 composite vane-impeller), and the HFP-342DI (HFP-RTN) composite vane-impeller pump.




Since the maximum output of the magneto power system in the 951 motor is about 18A, even a 12A power draw is “marginal” when considering the rest of the power requirements of the PWC, and that the battery must also be re-charged while riding.

The easiest and best fuel pump replacement should fit into the OE fuel pump module assembly, with the least modifications, and still keep all the original module design functions. The key designs of the module include a fuel intake on the very bottom of the tank, a spring to keep the intake on the bottom yet allow tank flex and easy installation, a reservoir to contain the return flow from the fuel rail, and a foot valve to keep the reservoir from leaking back into the tank. Some early methods of installing these replacement pumps would lose all of this functionality by hose clamping the pump inside the module, using a single filter sock attached to the pump, and use of an outlet hose eliminating the spring feature. This mounting has several drawbacks including the pump intake is no longer on the tank bottom, but about 2” above the bottom, diminishing the range of a ride. The reservoir functionality is also gone. To keep module functionality, and minimize modifications, a pump is chosen with an inlet port the same size as the OE pump port, so it exactly fits into the “inner” (second) filter screen, and aligned inlet and outlet ports to allow the same OE type of axial pump mounting. The 342 model of the “340” pump series has these features, whereas the 340 has too large of intake, and the 341 inlet and outlet ports are misaligned.

Current Best Replacement Pump

The current best Seadoo DI replacement fuel pump is the HFP-342DI from “High Flow Performance” which supplies 107 psi yet draws only 9A compared to the more common 12A plus power requirement of other similar pumps. The kit from HFP (HighFlowFuel.com) also includes the two filter strainers (FS220 and FS242) to exactly replace the OEM fuel module filters, two fuel resistant electrical connectors, and a piece of high pressure fuel resistant hose with hose clamps. The desired hose, a short black hose, or a longer flexible white hose, can be specified when ordering the pump.




Fuel Pump Module Removal

The following fuel pump replacement guide uses a 2001 GTX DI, but is similar to other DI Seadoo PWC and boats.

The easiest module access is obtained by removing the front storage compartment, then strap the hood open so it doesn’t fall on you. It is also easier if you remove the “glove box” console storage compartment to additionally provide top access. Remove the front air supply tube, and also the second one you can see behind it. The first tube can probably just be pulled off the upper connection, if not just loosen the large ratcheting strap. Only the “zip tie” (cable tie) that holds the top of the second tube to the hull needs to be clipped, the others can simply be left intact and slipped off the tube ends. Leave the zip ties that hold the tubes in their “Z” shape. Remove the filler end of the fuel fill hose from the hull and contort it out of the way behind the steering “column”. The first picture shows the view after the storage compartment is removed, and the next one shows the top of the tank and module after the air-tubes are removed and the fuel fill hose is tucked out of the way.




Unclick the fuel lines from the starboard hull supports, and use a 5/16” QC tool (a red metal tool shown) to separate the “Quick-Connects” for both the fuel supply and return lines.




Remove the gray vent hose from the top of the now visible module, and unclip the electrical connector. Use an 8mm nut driver to remove all the nuts holding the module to the top of the tank. Save the nuts and washers aside in a container so they don’t get lost in the bilge, since the nuts are brass and the washers are stainless steel, a retractor magnet won’t help to retrieve them. In the view from the top, notice the alignment arrow on the fuel module top, pointing at both the PWC port side, and the rubber gasket protruding tab (red arrows). Due to the uneven spacing of the mounting studs, the gasket and module can only go back in properly, with these aligned.




Carefully lift out the fuel pump module, noting there is a float for the fuel sensor (gauge) on the end of a pivoting metal rod. It helps to rotate the module 180 degrees when half way out so the bent float rod has a better exit angle. If it helps, remove the rod from the gauge now instead of later, with careful prying at the attachment point to pop it out of the plastic retainer clip on the gauge. The module reservoir will be partly full of fuel that can be poured into a container while tipping the module out of the tank or, if small enough in volume, can be poured out after module removal. Whatever fuel is spilled from the module or the fuel line disconnects will evaporate quickly if the hull is left open and well ventilated. After the module is removed, cover the tank opening to cut down on fuel evaporation and contamination.

Module Disassembly

Unplug the electrical connector from the fuel gauge and remove the float to avoid damaging the gauge. Unplug the electrical connector from the underside of the module top. The bottom filter screen can easily be removed from the module bottom at any time. Unclip the three sliding clips that hold the aluminum reservoir, and separate it from the top with hoses and external fuel filter can. The plastic outlet tube will extract from the “sliding seal” and the spring will come loose. The fuel pump can be pulled out of the reservoir now, if desired. You CAN do all the work through the top opening of the module reservoir, OR drill out the two aluminum pop rivets and remove the bottom of the reservoir making things easier on re-assembly. Two metal screws or new pop rivets can be used to anchor the bottom later. If the inner filter screen & rubber grommet has a good grip on the pump inlet, it will come out still attached to the pump, otherwise it will remain attached to the module bottom. Remove the inner filter from the module bottom keeping track of the underlying foot-valve components, which consists of a metal washer and a thin rubber washer. Separate the black rubber grommet from the inner filter since you will re-use this on the new filter screen.




Shown here is the OE fuel pump with the attached seal carrier, both inner and outer filter screens, and the module bottom with foot-valve washers. The next picture is of the removed sliding-seal.


Fuel Pump

Clip the old pump wiring off close to the pump to leave as much wire on the harness as possible. Slip the thin white plastic sheet off the pump body which supports the pump in the middle of the module. Unscrew the aluminum sliding-seal carrier from the top of the OE pump. Check the flexibility and viability of the black rubber sliding-seal. If it is still in good shape then the sliding seal and spring system can be retained. On RARE occasions this seal can fail causing loss of pressure even when the pump is still good. If the seal has failed, there is no known replacement, so a hose must be used between the top of the pump and the output tube where the seal used to slide. Then the spring system must be abandoned and other methods used to support the pump and hold the module together and firmly on the tank bottom. For example, see the novel flex-hose solution of “baddb1”: http://www.seadooforum.com/showthread.php?54790-2002-GTX-DI-Fuel-pumps
A picture from the forum thread showing the flex hose install is shown for reference.




However, we won’t discuss those solutions any further here, refer to the post on the forum.

The OE fuel pump was rigidly screwed to the sliding seal carrier, so with the pump bottom also held firmly by the inner filter grommet, the thin white plastic pump support could easily hold the pump in the middle of the module. This is no longer the case when the rigid connection is replaced with a flexible piece of hose, so a hose reinforcing method is needed to stiffen the connection. Rigidity from the pump inlet all the way through to the sliding seal is required so that there is no “tilting” of the seal interface which would cause leakage and pressure loss. This “tilting” and pressure loss has been observed on less rigid installs, due to the high g-forces associated with high speed PWC riding, maneuvering, and wave jumping or wave “crashing”.

The best solution found is to split a ½” piece of copper pipe lengthwise and anchor both halves around the hose with the same hose clamps used to hold the hose to the pump and seal carrier. To make the hose attachment to the seal carrier rigid, use a 5/16” brass hose barb with a female 1/8” NPT. These pictures show the OE pump inlet and rubber grommet, and the brass barb fitting with the seal carrier.




The 1/8” FNPT (FPT) doesn’t screw on all the way to the SAE 3/8-24 seal carrier thread since the barb is a tapered pipe thread, in addition to having 27 threads/inch rather than 24. However, it screws on pretty far and makes a rigid connection. The taper makes a good seal, especially with some Loctite PST 592 Teflon pipe thread sealant (same as used on the jet-pump oil filler plug). If the FPT is re-tapped to a 24 thread, the barb screws on farther but does not seal as well without the OE O-ring (and O-ring pocket). Therefore this is not recommended unless you have the ability to mill the O-ring pocket into the barb FNPT end. Some have tried not using a barb fitting and just placing the hose over the seal carrier thread. This apparently has worked for a time, but is not the first recommendation since it may not seal as well long-term, and the length of thread inside the hose is so short, it is not a rigid connection at all by comparison.




Measure the length needed of special in-tank black high pressure fuel hose (SAE J30R10 specs) to connect the pump outlet and brass barb fitting. Inferior rated hose will turn to mush after long immersion in fuel. Allowing for the barb and pump outlet lengths, a piece of hose about 1¾” long is appropriate, remembering that the hose length lessens about ¼” when stretched (swelled) over the pump outlet and barb fitting. Cut the copper pipe for the stiffener only a little less than the installed hose length to avoid interference with either the pump or the barb’s female end.




Install the hose on the pump and the barb fitting on the other end, then clamp the copper stiffener “shells” over the hose with either Oetiker clamps (17mm), or high quality all stainless worm drive hose clamps. With the copper to “smooth” out the pressure, a standard worm-drive hose clamp would be sufficient since the “flat spot” usually associated with the worm gear is smoothed out by the copper. Then screw the seal carrier into the female barb fitting using a bit of Loctite PST 592, or some other equivalent paste, on the threads as a sealer. Don’t use white Teflon tape since it will dissolve in fuel. Don’t tighten too much, or the threads will strip since they are different size.



 


DooWacka

Active Member
Messages
251
Likes
17
Location
Littleton, CO
Water Crafts
currently four 2001 GTX DI
#52
The cost from High Flow Fuel is $150.
http://www.highflowfuel.com/i-9051861-new-intank-fuel-pump-direct-injection-seadoo-sea-doo-gtx-di-rx-di-2000-2003.html
I can't see their listing on eBay anymore.
However, there are other companies springing up on eBay offering the same thing, and others offering a cheaper alternative.
Just do an eBay search for "Seadoo fuel pump DI".
Others of us have tried the cheap $40 pumps with good results so far.
However, unlike the HFP $150 pump, they aren't Lifetime Warranty, don't include both strainers, or the already built stiff metal "tube".
 

Hurban96

New Member
Messages
5
Likes
0
Location
richmond, va
Water Crafts
2008 rxp-x
#53
I just installed one of the pumps from highflowfuel and im having a few problems. Does the Pump have a check valve to hold pressure? When checking the fuel pressure it goes up to 27 with the lanyard on, but as soon as the pump stops priming the fuel pressure drops straight back to 0.
 

DooWacka

Active Member
Messages
251
Likes
17
Location
Littleton, CO
Water Crafts
currently four 2001 GTX DI
#54
If the pump has the white plastic top, which is I believe the one they are still sending, then no there is not a check valve. The lack of a check valve doesn't affect the operation while running. This white top pump is a "Returnless" pump made to operate in a Ford Mustang that doesn't have a return line from the fuel rail back to the tank.

As soon as the air compressor (on the back of the motor) starts pumping up to 80 psi, the fuel pump will have to pump to 27 psi above that, so you will get the 107 psi needed for operation. The DI should start at even about 90 psi.
 

davo1977

New Member
Messages
4
Likes
0
Location
houston
Water Crafts
2002 seadoo gtx DI
#55
If the pump has the white plastic top, which is I believe the one they are still sending, then no there is not a check valve. The lack of a check valve doesn't affect the operation while running. This white top pump is a "Returnless" pump made to operate in a Ford Mustang that doesn't have a return line from the fuel rail back to the tank.

As soon as the air compressor (on the back of the motor) starts pumping up to 80 psi, the fuel pump will have to pump to 27 psi above that, so you will get the 107 psi needed for operation. The DI should start at even about 90 psi.
Can anyone tell me why you cant remove the top cast piece that the hoses connect to off the fuel pump?
I removed it to install the hiflow fuel pump, reinstalled but ski wont run and its spewing gas from the top of pump down into tank, I tried to reseal the two O-rings but not sure if its supposed to do that or not. Do I have to buy a whole new pump now?
 

DooWacka

Active Member
Messages
251
Likes
17
Location
Littleton, CO
Water Crafts
currently four 2001 GTX DI
#56
You don't have to remove the cast metal piece to rebuild the pump module, but it is OK. When you reinsert the metal piece with the two O-rings, just lube them with a little oil, and it will snap back into place. The smaller O-ring is very important since it seals the high pressure side. The low pressure side just returns unused fuel from the Fuel/Air rail. So, it is supposed to "dribble" the low pressure fuel back into the tank. If it is "spewing" at high pressure the smaller O-ring isn't in right or is damaged. This won't allow the pressure to build to 107 psi, and the DI won't run.
 

davo1977

New Member
Messages
4
Likes
0
Location
houston
Water Crafts
2002 seadoo gtx DI
#57
You don't have to remove the cast metal piece to rebuild the pump module, but it is OK. When you reinsert the metal piece with the two O-rings, just lube them with a little oil, and it will snap back into place. The smaller O-ring is very important since it seals the high pressure side. The low pressure side just returns unused fuel from the Fuel/Air rail. So, it is supposed to "dribble" the low pressure fuel back into the tank. If it is "spewing" at high pressure the smaller O-ring isn't in right or is damaged. This won't allow the pressure to build to 107 psi, and the DI won't run.
Thank you Mr. Wacka! Thats kinda what I was thinking, it was spewing big time, and I bought some o rings at auto parts store but none were correct size, I just bought a complete new fuel pump off ebay since I was tired of worrying how I was going to fix. Have a good day, and know that you majorly helped me!
 

Geeps2900

New Member
Messages
9
Likes
0
Location
Calgary alberta
Water Crafts
2002 RXDI
#58
Doowaka, my felco pump seems to draw too much power. Since I plugged it in, the beeps I was talking about before ended up being from the battery not charging while the engine is running (low voltage). You stated the felco only draws 6 amps, how can I check this with a voltmeter? By the way, I've changed the rectifier thinking it was the issue but even though the new one is giving me a solid 18 amps, the battery still isn't charging. I've ruled out almost everything except the fuel pump. I'm going to plug the port hole on the side as you have done to see if that makes the pump work less, but if that doesn't work, I'm going to have to get another pump. Any thoughts? Thank you,

Geeps
 
Messages
174
Likes
0
Location
28023
Water Crafts
2 o1 GTX DI'S
98 GTX LIMITED
97 GTX 787
#61
yeah its great, I have a new one I keep in reserve they work great, doowackas article is top shelf, I changed both my pumps with them all fuel issues gone,
 
Messages
174
Likes
0
Location
28023
Water Crafts
2 o1 GTX DI'S
98 GTX LIMITED
97 GTX 787
#62
hi nephi, I have two 01 DI's, if your going to keep yours I would suggest buying the candoo scanner and just bypass the info center, I have used mine so much its paid for itself 5 times over, it has realtime diagnostic functions can manipulate sensors, injectors, and whole lot more, if I had taken mine to the dealership to have it scanned it would have been 100.00 a pop, you can program keys , well go read up on it, I highly suggest it, its called the candoo pro and comes with up to 4 different skis for the owner user, I would pay double for mine now that I have it
 

DooWacka

Active Member
Messages
251
Likes
17
Location
Littleton, CO
Water Crafts
currently four 2001 GTX DI
#63
Doowaka, my felco pump seems to draw too much power. Since I plugged it in, the beeps I was talking about before ended up being from the battery not charging while the engine is running (low voltage). You stated the felco only draws 6 amps, how can I check this with a voltmeter? By the way, I've changed the rectifier thinking it was the issue but even though the new one is giving me a solid 18 amps, the battery still isn't charging. I've ruled out almost everything except the fuel pump. I'm going to plug the port hole on the side as you have done to see if that makes the pump work less, but if that doesn't work, I'm going to have to get another pump. Any thoughts? Thank you,

Geeps
The only easy way to measure current is with a clamp meter, which has a ferrite "clamp" that you place around the wire to measure inductively without breaking the circuit. Make sure it can do DC current. The clamp meters that can only measure AC current are much cheaper.
You can clamp around one of the two fuel pump wires coming off the connector on top of the installed pump module. Or, you can access them easier on connector #4 on the MPEM. Use either of the outer wires of the 3 heavier gauge wires at the top of the connector (4-24 or 4-26).
Often when pumps get dirty, or are wearing out, they use more current.
 

DooWacka

Active Member
Messages
251
Likes
17
Location
Littleton, CO
Water Crafts
currently four 2001 GTX DI
#64
This is an update on the hours of service so far on the various DI replacement fuel pumps I currently have installed.

1) HighFlowFuel.com HFP-RTN (9 Amp draw, with white plastic top, Lifetime warranty) - 52.2 hours so far
2) Another HFP-RTN - 39.4 hours so far
3) HFP-382 (or equivalent), a very common cheap pump (6 Amp draw, gold anodized) - 18.7 hours so far
4) HFP-342 (or equivalent, Walbro knockoff), (high current draw, ~12 Amp) - 39.4 hours, then became unreliable
I will probably replace this failed 342 pump with the HFP-382 (6 Amp) or equivalent

It is disappointing to only get 39 hours out of the HFP-342, but I will be glad to get a lower current draw pump.
The HFP-342 was the pump HighFLowFuel used to sell for the DI, before they switched to the current HFP-RTN (white top) pump.
 

Geeps2900

New Member
Messages
9
Likes
0
Location
Calgary alberta
Water Crafts
2002 RXDI
#65
So I tested the amperage draw on the fuel pump. It drew 7 amps on the first two times I primed it and 9 amps on the third time. While I turned the motor over, the pump was drawing 6 amps but the motor wouldn't start because I had harness #4 unplugged. To me, this amperage doesn't sound unreasonable but please tell me if I'm wrong. I replugged the harness and started the motor, but the battery voltage stayed around 12.1 volts. I am at a complete loss, why did the battery suddenly stop recharging since I put in the new pump!? Should I throw money at a high flow and see if that works? Other than the battery slowly discharging as I ride the Doo, the motor runs perfect.
 

DooWacka

Active Member
Messages
251
Likes
17
Location
Littleton, CO
Water Crafts
currently four 2001 GTX DI
#66
You are right, the current doesn't sound to bad.
I used to have a couple of pumps that would draw 12 Amps or better. They would not charge the battery while idling, and would in fact discharge at about a -2 Amp rate. However, when running at speed they would charge at about a +1.5 Amp rate. I would tell people that rode them not to idle to long, or the battery would run down.
To get that comfortable feeling of measuring a running battery voltage of 13+ volts is not going to happen, unless you can find a pump like the OEM pump that only drew about 4 Amps.
 

Geeps2900

New Member
Messages
9
Likes
0
Location
Calgary alberta
Water Crafts
2002 RXDI
#67
I just read a post from you in another thread. In it, you stated the stock pump draws 2 amps while priming, 4 while running and 5 while turning the motor fast. At 7 to 9 amps while priming, I'm starting to think my pump draws too much power for the rectifier, even while revving fast. When I turn the motor at 5000k, the voltage doesn't go much above 12.18, which means the battery slowly drains down.

Another one of your posts mentioned that the HFP-382 performed well and the HFP-342 which did not. High Flow Performance now sells the HFP-342DI, is this the same as the 342 you mentioned? I want to try my luck with a different pump before I break down and buy the OEM pump for 700 off Amazon.

Thanks for you time replying DooWacka, it is very much appreciated.
 

DooWacka

Active Member
Messages
251
Likes
17
Location
Littleton, CO
Water Crafts
currently four 2001 GTX DI
#68
I was surprised to only get 39 hours out of the HFP-342 (black plastic top). This was the original pump HighFlow sold for the DI.

The pump they are currently selling for the DI is called the HFP-342DI, but is a totally different pump (smaller with a white plastic top). They took the HFP-RTN pump that they sell for the Ford Mustang and added the two strainers and the already built metal "stiffener" so you can just screw it on the OE "sliding seal" tube. Since they had been selling the 342 for the DI, they just called this new setup the HFP-342DI, even though it is a different pump. As stated here above, I am currently running two of these pumps with great success.
 

Olddude

New Member
Messages
4
Likes
0
Location
Michigan
Water Crafts
Seadoo XP DI
#69
Thanks to you, DooWacka with your excellent guide and direction, I am installing the HighFlow HFP 342-DI on my 04 XPDI. The pump I received from HighFlow just screws on the aluminum sliding seal tube with the new pump's brass fitting. It is not a tapered fitting and screws all the way by hand to bottom out on the end of the sliding seal tube. There remains about 1/2" of thread on the tube when it's bottomed out and the original o ring is that far from seating, although there is no bevel for it in the new pump's brass fitting anyway. (This also makes the assembly about that distance longer than the original) Is this setup supposed to just bottom out without taper seal or o ring, and will it seal ok like that or have I got the wrong fitting on the pump I received or do I need to do something else? Any input from you would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
 

DooWacka

Active Member
Messages
251
Likes
17
Location
Littleton, CO
Water Crafts
currently four 2001 GTX DI
#70
I assume HighFlow is sending the only brass barbed fitting that I believe is available (5/16" barb to 1/8" Female Pipe Thread). When I have used my own fitting, not the already setup version from HighFLow, there is certainly a lot less than 1/2" of thread still showing.

As I stated in post #1 of this thread:
"The 1/8” FNPT (FPT) doesn’t screw on all the way to the SAE 3/8-24 seal carrier thread since the barb is a tapered pipe thread, in addition to having 27 threads/inch rather than 24. However, it screws on pretty far and makes a rigid connection. The taper makes a good seal, especially with some Loctite PST 592 Teflon pipe thread sealant (same as used on the jet-pump oil filler plug)".

So, the fitting doesn't really "bottom out", the 27 to 24 thread mismatch eventually just tightens up suddenly. You should use the Teflon PST 592 to seal the threads. However, I have never tested how well it seals without anything on the threads.

Again, I assume that HFP designed their length to be like I mentioned in post #1, since that is the document they used. There is room for different lengths in the sliding seal assembly, as long as when the module is fully tightened down in the tank, the seal isn't "topped" out on the black plastic tube.
 

Olddude

New Member
Messages
4
Likes
0
Location
Michigan
Water Crafts
Seadoo XP DI
#71
DooWacka, wanted to let you know your response as to the HighFlow pump to me was absolutely correct as the fitting did seat to a taper rather than bottom out and the assembled length worked fine. I installed per your guide and the pump works fine, started right up and runs, whereas would only run about 5 seconds and quit before. I do seem to have a new issue in that the Seadoo is somewhat doggy at speed, about 400 rpm low wide open. I will probably rig up a fuel pressure tester along the lines of your description and test on the water when I can, and will post if I am able to find anything that may help others here. Anyway, wanted to thank you for sharing your expertise and time with me and others on this forum as it is certainly appreciated.
 

Geeps2900

New Member
Messages
9
Likes
0
Location
Calgary alberta
Water Crafts
2002 RXDI
#72
Thanks Doowacka and Topglock, I broke down and ordered the HFP - 342DI, installed it in less than 30 minutes (while looking after 3 kids) and voila! It started right away and the battery voltage was close to 13v just from a few presses on the throttle. There were no beeps. I should have bought that pump in the first place. For anyone reading this out there, don't bother with the silver $60 Chinese pumps because they draw too much power. I look forward to burning a whole tank of gas on the lake and having a fully charged battery.
 

Topglock

New Member
Messages
8
Likes
0
Location
SE Michigan
Water Crafts
2001 Seadoo GTX DI
#73
Glad to hear. HFP makes it simple since they send the pumps ready to go per DooWacka
This thread was a life saver and a huge $$ saver :thumbsup:
 

Olddude

New Member
Messages
4
Likes
0
Location
Michigan
Water Crafts
Seadoo XP DI
#74
DooWacka, not sure I am worthy here, but I'm still trying. Rigged pressure gauge with old compression tester per your learned suggestion that works great. Lanyard test was fine went to 27-28 and back to 0 per your indication of no check valve in the HighFlow pump. Ran it, went to 105 initially on the water and then began dogging out and gauge showed approx 95 and as low as 90. Looks like pressure problem with new pump or my installation of it. Line is clear to the fuel rail, disconnected and blew though it. Question is: service manual has check to isolate pump from regulator by checking pump in closed loop with gauge installed between outlet hose and return tube just cycling through the pump and back with pressure to be 105# minimum when engaging lanyard. They use special Seadoo part#: blah.. blah.. pressure relief valve in the gauge setup that no one will be able to buy and admonish that not using may damage the air compressor system, but they also use it in the inline system to the fuel rail test that makes no sense. What is your take on if I can do a closed loop test on the pump installed in the machine in this fashion without this pressure relief valve and look for 105# to see if my pump is good or not? Any thoughts appreciated.
 

DooWacka

Active Member
Messages
251
Likes
17
Location
Littleton, CO
Water Crafts
currently four 2001 GTX DI
#75
Yes, you can do a closed loop test, where the loop excludes the rail and the air compressor. As you observed, you are just connecting to the short hoses coming from the fuel module. I have a valve installed inline on my tester, that I use to restrict the flow to produce and verify the 107 psi. You don't need the fancy Seadoo spring loaded part. Just be careful to slowly increase the pressure so you don't go higher than you want. I have tested an OEM pump to over 160 psi this way. This closed loop test has no way of "damaging the compressor", since it is not in the loop. Since you only have the few seconds of power to the fuel pump when you place the key on the post, you may have to try a few times to adjust the valve properly.
 

Users who viewed this discussion (Total:1)

Adsense

Usergroup

Administrator Moderator Premium Member
Top