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Help. No Clue.

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Water Crafts
94 Sea-Doo XP5854
#26
So I purchased a vacuum pump to suck the oil out and it is on the way. I'm a little fuzzy on the injector oil system. I see a supply (after the filter) and return line to the injection oil tank that still has oil in it. These two go to each side of the engine on the bottom. Does this oil get circulated through the crank? Should I suck the oil out of those lines? Then there is a hose going to the oil injection pump. Any advise would be appreciated. I read in the shop manual about bleeding the system. Once all oil is removed and fresh added, I'm assuming that I should bleed it??
 

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mikidymac

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Water Crafts
2003 GTI
2001 XP
1996 XP
1996 HX
1991 Superjet
2001 Superjet
#27
So, yes, there are two different oil systems supplied by the same tank.

First get all that old oil out of all hoses and replace with the correct API-TC rated oil, either the Black and White Seadoo bottle of 2T CARB, Mystic ore Lucas makes one.

The large 12mm oil lines feed a cavity in the crankcase that has a gear on the crankshaft and a right angel gear for your rotary valve that acts like and intake valve. This is just a flooded chamber that is fed by gravity and never circulates. This is also where the seals are that are probably slowly leaking on yours.

The 10mm line with the filter is actually for the oil injection that lubricates the pistons and bearings. I suggest a new filter then bleed the pump per the manual. You should also replace the little 3/32" oil lines from the oil pump to the intake manifold as they get old and break and cause engines to seize. You can get 3/32" Tygon hose in the plumbing section of Home Depot, it says "Small engine Fuel Hose" on the package and is orange/pinkish.
 
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Water Crafts
94 Sea-Doo XP5854
#29
Just standard 1/4" automotive black fuel hose is fine.
Well, you can't replace the seals on the crank w/o replacing the whole crank. somewhere, you probably have a slow oil leak. Better hope it's in your rotary shaft seal as that one is easily removeable compared to the crank. It's probably a slow leak and you may be okay to run it, but if you crank the engine over the way it is now with the plugs in, you'll hydrolock it. Suck all that oil out from the case. Rotate the engine to get the crank out of the way so you can get your sucktion tube right to the bottom of the case. May have to take the carb manifold (Rotary Valve cover) off. Once it's all out, turn it over with the starter, but have plugs out, and hold a rag above the plug holes. You'll spew lots of oil vapor. Be careful in taking off the Rotary Valve. Mark what tooth goes to what tooth so you can easily reassemble it later. If it is the RV seal, you'll see it weeping once you take that manifold off. If it's a slow leak, you will only see it after a few days or so.
Was I supposed to mark the white gear on this assembly when I removed it because I didn't?? I did leave the thin part on the shaft in image 2188 and 2183.
 

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Location
Virginia Sea Level
Water Crafts
2001 Sportster LE 951 Carbed
#30
My $0.02, I'm not big on the small inline automotive type filters either, a clean tank is the best approach and make sure not to lend your gas cans out if you don't intend on checking them carefully for cleanliness afterward.

Keep them out of the rain and look inside them using a flashlight before filling them, you might be surprised by what you find in a "clean" gas can, I pay real close attention to mine yet I find crud in them often! How, I cannot explain.
 
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Location
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Water Crafts
2001 Sportster LE 951 Carbed
#31
Yes, the rotary intake valve gears must have an oil bath for lubrication. And the timing position of the rotary valve in relationship to the crankshaft position is important for the intake stroke, it must be timed correctly else it runs poorly if at all.
 

etemplet

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Water Crafts
1996 SPI, 1996 GTX, 1997 GTX
#32
I am one of the ones that doesn't like the additional inline filters and have actually seen them give issues but that's just my $0.02.

If your tank, strainer and system are clean there isn't a need for them.
I had nothing but trouble with an inline filter on my SPI. Couldn't find the problem. As Miki mentioned.... I took his advice and threw it away and.... no more problems with the SPI. :D
 

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