2001 240 EFI M2 FPR vacuum hose substitute?

Printimus

Premium Member
Premium Member
Hi all, new boat owner here. Been working on getting a 2001 Challenger 2000 with a 240 EFI M2 engine up and running.
I had to remove the VST to get the bad fuel pump out of it and in the removal process, I ended breaking the vacuum line that goes to the fuel pressure regulator. It being 23 years old, was seized onto the nipple of the FPR, so when I lightly tugged on it, it gave easily and broke the line. Looking online for replacement parts (PN: 32-879646A1), dealers and even ebay wants upwards of $200 for what looks like a 6 inch vacuum line. I plan on replacing the FPR too as it was severly corroded during removal/disassembly.

So I ask all of you experts and wisdom-filled boaters out there, why the $200 price for a simple line? It does not appear to be specially molded or formed. Are there any good substitutes I can use instead? Is this something I can get for cheap at an auto parts store if I take a piece of the broken line in and get the same diameter/thickness/length of hose?

Any help is much appreciated. I've been browsing the internet for a few weeks now learning about this thing called "boating".

:D

Cheers,

Alex
 
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So I went to NAPA auto parts and got a hose of the same inner diameter (slightly larger outer diameter). The original hose length was about 5-6 inches long. I got 12 inches of the new hose from NAPA for $2.49. Will report back when the VST gets reinstalled and all the hoses and parts are hooked up.

Somebody recently told me that BOAT stands for "Break Out Another Thousand" and with the way parts are priced from dealers and warehouses, I'm starting to believe it. :p
 
Good call. I would have done the same. Just ensure the new hose doesn't kink. I'm a little more picky about fuel lines on boats/pwc. I don't like those clear tubing lots of folks use (definitely not Coast Guard approved marine fuel line)... but vacuum line isn't anything special. As long as it's stiff enough not to collapse.

So true about BOAT... especially if you ever have to rebuild your 240efi.

Cheers!
 
Welp, got the engine parts all put back together and she turns over and viola! Everything sounds pretty good. She idles nicely. Will take her out for a maiden voyage probably this weekend.
 
The maiden voyage after all the repairs went well until it didn't. Got the boat unloaded into the water, fired her up and she took off and rode well. Fuel gauge is broken and this being the first time taking it out, I decided to stop after about 40 minutes of cruising to check fuel levels. Turned the engine off, opened the hatch and levels were good. Go to start the engine again and it just cranks, no ignition. So we were left stranded for about another 40 minutes until a friend came and rescued/towed us back to the boat ramp. A day later and it still doesnt start, will be going over all the parts I replaced to double check my work and then looking over ALL the electricals. Ugh..... boats.... fun but frustrating.
 
Ouch. Were you able to confirm no-spark with a spark tester? I've battled hot-restart issues in the past but they were fuel issues... flooded, too rich on hot restarts (leaking injectors). If definite no-spark... I'd be looking at the coil kill wire (from the ignition) (black/yellow) to ensure it wasn't staying grounded and killing spark at the coils. Next I'd look at the trigger (under flywheel, under stator)... this tells the coils when to fire (in pairs). I've had a bad trigger kill spark to a pair of plugs before... still ran but couldn't get on-plane. Check battery for good voltage. A fried voltage regulator (been there too) will not charge the battery and cause electrical issues. Good luck.
 
Ouch. Were you able to confirm no-spark with a spark tester? I've battled hot-restart issues in the past but they were fuel issues... flooded, too rich on hot restarts (leaking injectors). If definite no-spark... I'd be looking at the coil kill wire (from the ignition) (black/yellow) to ensure it wasn't staying grounded and killing spark at the coils. Next I'd look at the trigger (under flywheel, under stator)... this tells the coils when to fire (in pairs). I've had a bad trigger kill spark to a pair of plugs before... still ran but couldn't get on-plane. Check battery for good voltage. A fried voltage regulator (been there too) will not charge the battery and cause electrical issues. Good luck.
Lots of good ideas to check for! I have a spark tester and will be looking into that first. I hope to God it's not a leaking injector, I've browsed the removal procedures and I do not want to disassemble that many things... Has 2 batteries, one brand new and the other tested good. It turns over real strong, just no starting.

I appreciate the wisdom and thank you for the suggestions on where to look!
 
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