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hfgreg
08-08-07, 12:03 PM
And a few other cleaning tips...
You can wash and wax your boat all you want but it seems those pesky little water spots are inevitable. While regular washing, drying with a soft towel, and waxing are great ways to help prevent spots, there are measures you can take to remove them when they do appear.
Before use of any of the below products, methods, or water spot removers make sure to read the directions and first test the cleaner on a small area of the hull. It is usually recommended that products be applied in a shady or cool area, as opposed to being in the sun. Some methods also work for calcium build-up on an outboard engine and lower units that are exposed to heat exhaust. Avoid cleaning your boat in the water to reduce the risk of toxic materials spilling into the water.

Try the Following Water Spot Removal Methods:

1) BABE'S Spot Solver
BABE'S Spot Solver is specifically developed to remove hard water spots caused from mineral build-up.

2) Vinegar and Water (homemade)
Mix one gallon of water with one cup of vinegar. Rub spots with a soft cloth. A few applications may be required before spots are removed. Note that after this use your wax will most likely be gone. Don't forget to re-wax.

I've heard that there is an actual product on the market called Cleaning Vinegar that works really well.

3) Lime Away / CLR
Though they are fairly aggressive products, CLR and Lime Away will also work, and many swear by them. Use these for the more severe cases of neglect.

To make your own, mix one part Lime Away and 10 parts demineralized water. It works best while boat is still wet after use. Spray it on and wipe with a soft towel. Don't let it sit for a prolonged time. Rinse away immediately. Follow with a hull cleaner and wax.

4) Isso Fiberglass Reconditioner
Restores color to faded fiberglass. Removes oxidation and chalking, water-line, water spots, tars and oils.

5) Other Household Cleaning Products
Some use shower cleaning products such as Shower Clean and Lysol. Like most other methods, these products work best when the hull is still wet.

6) Extra Tidbit
For a yellow stained hull, lubricate it with WD-40 spray.

From: http://waterski.about.com/

Puredigtl
03-10-08, 12:49 PM
Ducky's!!!!!

I swear by it. Takes care of the spots even if a wipe-down after use is not done (Bad Kids...BAD!!!) and it sits all winter.

kustomkarl
03-10-08, 01:13 PM
That sounds like a winner to me ...I gota get me a duck.

Karl

Outnumbered
04-08-08, 03:54 AM
Forget Ducky. Get some Hot Sauce at www.boatbling.net This stuff blows them all away. Developed for high-end fiberglass custom boats. Good stuff.

https://boatbling.net/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=12&zenid=158df0d031e69ec463bc86d49e7bb8de

All Things Custom
04-08-08, 10:24 AM
We have very hard water here in AZ and the best thing we have found to use is water and vinegar solution. About 1/2 and 1/2.

Just spray it on and wipe it off.

Now for the GOOD STUFF... To bring those moldy old hulls back to life when I lived in FL, I found a product called AWSOME cleaner. Its at the dollar store.

spray this on and use a green scotch brite pad with the sponge on the back. I have brought dead hulls that were covered in mold and mildew back with this stuff and its only a dollar a bottle.

Outnumbered
04-08-08, 12:21 PM
We have very hard water here in AZ and the best thing we have found to use is water and vinegar solution. About 1/2 and 1/2.

Just spray it on and wipe it off.

Now for the GOOD STUFF... To bring those moldy old hulls back to life when I lived in FL, I found a product called AWSOME cleaner. Its at the dollar store.

spray this on and use a green scotch brite pad with the sponge on the back. I have brought dead hulls that were covered in mold and mildew back with this stuff and its only a dollar a bottle.

Try some Hot Sauce, it works better than vinegar/water and leaves a protective coating too. You should be able to buy it in Havasu--check the website.

scooper77515
04-08-08, 08:48 PM
...I pulled off the decals and saw how much the non-covered areas had been spotted. I used spray brake cleaner from the auto parts store. It actually melts the outside layer of plastic/fiberglass, so be VERY careful. Just use it for the TOUGH spots.

My ski looks brand new now, with only one-half can of the spray.

I sprayed a small area of the ski and used a terry cloth to wipe it in and off. Do it quickly. And I would not recommend using it on the decals. The way it melts plastic, I bet it would smear your decals. I would compare this stuff to compressed acetone in a can...

AGAIN...use this only for the really tough spots!

kustomkarl
04-08-08, 08:52 PM
...I pulled off the decals and saw how much the non-covered areas had been spotted. I used spray brake cleaner from the auto parts store. It actually melts the outside layer of plastic/fiberglass, so be VERY careful. Just use it for the TOUGH spots.

My ski looks brand new now, with only one-half can of the spray.

I sprayed a small area of the ski and used a terry cloth to wipe it in and off. Do it quickly. And I would not recommend using it on the decals. The way it melts plastic, I bet it would smear your decals. I would compare this stuff to compressed acetone in a can...

AGAIN...use this only for the really tough spots!

Scott, if you use too much of that stuff the hull of you seadoo will be transparent.:ack:

scooper77515
04-09-08, 05:14 PM
It is...in some places:D

Seriously, though, I do NOT recommend this stuff for regular, or even seasonal cleaning. I just had to get 6 years of "sitting through hurricanes in a garage at 4' above sea-level" grime off.

Just to get the tough stuff off. The rest came off with polishing compound or soapy water.

kustomkarl
04-09-08, 08:20 PM
Be careful of the polishing compound, because it takes off a layer of gel coat every time you rub it out...I would coat everything with a good coat of Teflon wax to add some protection that will last.

Karl